Wayside Sign

Wayside Sign

Object ID: 2013-080-002

Date: 2013

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Pine Lake Country Club

Wayside Sign

Object ID: 2013-080-001

Date: 2013

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Pine Lake Auto Club

Cass Lake

Object ID: 2013-070-015

Date: 2013

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Wilkins

Object ID: 2013-070-014

Date: 2013

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Westacres Community Bus

Object ID: 2013-070-013

Date: 2013

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West Bloomfield Trail

Object ID: 2013-070-012

Date: 2013

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Tale of the Rail

Object ID: 2013-070-011

Date: 2013

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Orchard Lake Museum

Object ID: 2013-070-010

Date: 2013

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New Life for Auto Workers

Object ID: 2013-070-009

Date: 2013

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Michigan Military Academy

Object ID: 2013-070-008

Date: 2013

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Interlaken Hotel

Object ID: 2013-070-007

Date: 2013

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Ice Saw

Object ID: 2013-070-006

Date: 2013

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DUR map

Object ID: 2013-070-005

Date: 2013

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Detroiters-Escape

Object ID: 2013-070-004

Date: 2013

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Countryside Improvement Associaion

Object ID: 2013-070-003

Date: 2013

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Wilkins Restarunrant Indian

Object ID: 2013-070-002

Date: 1951

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“Created by Greta Chaney.  I am also a sculptor and do the same type of work as my mother, sculpted concrete over steel.  Very few people do that type of sculpture.  Maybe this has shed some light on one of your displays.” – Alana E. O’Kelly (Chaney)

Wilkins Restarunrant Indian

Object ID: 2013-070-001

Date: 1959

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“We just found an article about a display you have showing the remains of a statue of Chief Pontiac. He was made by my mother, Greta Chaney in 1951 and a second in 1961. I am sending two photos I have of the two statues she made for the same Restaurant. They are taken with my iPad so they are not great but they will give you a link to their beginning. If you are interested in more detailed photos, I can take them to be copied professionally. Please let me know if you are interested.” – Alana E. O’Kelly (Chaney)

Discovered Horse’s Shoe Forrest Dandison Farm

Object ID: 2013-050-001

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Located at the current Scotch School.

MIchigan Map 1837

Object ID: 2013-040-001

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Donated by Don Moore

Camp Tinega – Leona Mason Heitsch

Object ID: 2013-030-006

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“Regarding Camp Tinega, Protestant Children’s Home: My father was orchard manager of Walnut Glen Fruit Farms, which was on the corner of Middlebelt and Lone Pine, SW. The end of the “”new orchard”” on the west was bordered by The Protestant Children’s Home.  The boys often climbed the fence to enjoy “”Egg Lake”” (now Bloomfield, I think).  One child drowned there, one child left a partially carved out wooden boat, which I still have, we never saw the children, they came cautiously and of course without the knowledge of the staff at the camp.  After school started a couple of the boys would hike to the corner of Middlebelt and Lone Pine and ride with Dad and me to Pine Lake School, time frame from 1939 to the early forties.  One was Norman Krushka (spelling?).  The two of them were very subdued young teens, one could feel their emotional state, even if one was younger than they were. Leona Mason Heitsch”

Sailboat Sheila on Orchard Lake

Object ID: 2013-030-005

Date: 1885

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Sailing on Orchard Lake in 1885 aboard the “Sheila,” owned by Apple Island resident Forrest Campbell. Campbell’s parents, Colin and Caroline Campbell, purchased the island in 1856. It remained in the family until 1915. Photo by Al Butler. William McIsaac Collection

Fishing off Apple Island on Orchard Lake

Object ID: 2013-030-004

Date: 1885

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Campbell family. William McIsaac Collection

Orchard Lake Hotel Ad 1873

Object ID: 2013-030-003

Date: 1873

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Orchard Lake Hotel Ad 1873

Native American (Chief Pontiac?)

Object ID: 2013-030-002

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(Donated by Thomas Rowen) Depicts an Indian (Chief Pontiac or one of his tribe?) looking out over Orchard Lake towards Apple Island. These paintings used to hang on the walls in the old Wilkins Hotel at the corner of Pontiac Trail and Orchard Lake Road. They came into my possession many , many years ago when the Wilkins Hotel closed and became The Meeting Place.

Native American (Chief Pontiac?)

Object ID: 2013-030-001

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(Donated by Thomas Rowen) Depicts an Indian (Chief Pontiac or one of his tribe?) looking out over Orchard Lake towards Apple Island. These paintings used to hang on the walls in the old Wilkins Hotel at the corner of Pontiac Trail and Orchard Lake Road. They came into my possession many , many years ago when the Wilkins Hotel closed and became The Meeting Place.

Daniel Whitfield photo image

Object ID: 2013-020-001

Date: 1823-1898

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Daniel Whitfield photo 1823-1898

Fresh Air Camp

Object ID: 2013-020-002

Date: 1907

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The Detroit Free Press began the Fresh Air Camp in 1906 to give underprivileged Detroit children the experience of two weeks of recreation in the countryside. Most were on their first trips away from home, their first rides in new modes of transportation – interurban trolleys, automobiles, buses – which brought them to a whole new world in only an hour. Until 1962 the camp gave children sunshine, fresh air, fun and good food. Generations of village residents shared in play and entertainment with the visiting children.

Merrill Mills Dream

Object ID: 2013-020-003

Date: 1890

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Merrill B. Mills had many plans in the early 1890s for his land around Sylvan Lake. His Sylvan Lake Improvement Association developed lakeside subdivisions and a resort hotel. He hired architect
W. B. Stratton to design a resort hotel. The Sylvan Lake Inn was built in 1893 on this Point, including a dance pavilion, bowling alley, billiard parlor and riding stables. To make it easier to visit, in 1895 Mills built an electric trolley line along Garland Avenue linking the Inn to Pontiac. Festivities were followed by financial difficulties, and the Inn burned to the ground in 1903.

Oakland County Boat Club

Object ID: 2013-020-004

Date: 1912-2012

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Many founding members toiled long days in the early automobile factories to gather $500 to buy this site on Sylvan Lake. The first meetings were held in an old shed used for a boat livery. In 1916 the Boat Club was built with rooms for dining, dancing and meetings. The club’s prospects dimmed when returning World War I veterans abandoned their boats for the new automobile craze. Eventually
automobiles and the trolley line brought new members to Sylvan Lake looking for relief from the crowded roads and city life.

Shores of Sylvan Lake

Object ID: 2013-020-005

Date: 1890

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Sylvan Lake is called “” The Prettiest Little City in Michigan.”” Its name means “wooded shady lake” for its unique natural beauty. A trip to Sylvan Lake gave people a new attitude on life. After the 1890s, trolleys and automobiles allowed people to visit Tower Beach on the Telegraph Road side of the lake for slide rides, picnics, fishing and swimming. In the 1940s marshy lakefront property on the south side of the lake was filled to create Ferndale Beach and Park for the enjoyment and growth of the community.

Traveling Sylvan Lake

Object ID: 2013-020-006

Date: 1900

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Trolleys and automobiles appeared in southeast Michigan around then, and more people could enjoy distant places. Travel time from Detroit to Sylvan Lake’s natural beauty and attractions was slashed
to about an hour. In the early 1890s, entrepreneur Merrill B. Mills planned hundreds of acres of his property at Sylvan Lake as streets, subdivisions and the luxurious Sylvan Lake Inn. Even more boldly, he created a local link to the regional trolley system, inviting visitors and investors to the community he was creating.

Max Klein Painter inventor

Object ID: 2013-020-007

Date: 1950

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Max Klein was the man who invented (or co-invented) paint-by-numbers, the fad that swept the nation in the early 1950s. In 1956 he sold his interest in the painting business (Craft Master brand) and began a successful career in plastics.  Later in life, Max resided in West Bloomfield until his death on 20 May 1993. I am writing a brief biographical sketch of Max and would like to know if you have in your holdings any information relating to him?

Thanking you in advance for the favor of your reply, I am,

Le Roy G. Barnett PhD
Contributing Editor
CHRONICLE Magazine
Historical Society of Michigan

Harold Ward Obituary

Object ID: 2013-020-008

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Harold Ward Obituary

Chief Pontiac Indian Bust

Object ID: 2013-020-009

Date: 1760

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Ceramic bust of Native American Chief Pontiac donated February 2013 by James Bowers which now resides in the museum.

Mr. Don Ostrander

Object ID: 2013-001-034

Date: 1985-1991

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Children were bussed from around Pontiac during this time.  I’m sorry to say that from 1985 – 91 there was little connection between the school and the Sylvan community. As for the “Mary and Her Lamb” mural, “never give up”.

Mr. Jack Colbert

Object ID: 2013-001-033

Date: 1980-1985

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1980 – 1985 Whitfield School Principal Mr. Colbert taught 6th grade at Whitfield in the 1960’s. You had to practically fight to get to teach at Whitfield. It was a wonderful place to work. As Principal, Mr. Colbert remembers the weekly assemblies with students and the dedicated staff.  He had a great office staff: Marie Ciavarella, June Leonard, and Joanne Hubbard. Whitfield had the best student body in Pontiac. The parents were very involved in the school.

Mr. Howard Caldwell

Object ID: 2013-001-032

Date: 1976-1980

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Principal. Unfortunately, Mr. Caldwell passed away several years ago and his family has moved from the area.

Mr. William E. Neff

Object ID: 2013-001-031

Date: 1967-1976

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Principal. I began the 1963-64 school year as principal of Hawthorne Elementary School and informed by Supt. Dana Whitmer in mid-November that I would be transferred to Whitfield at the conclusion of the Thanksgiving break due to the illness of Principal Vida Walker. The coming years saw the staff change through the retirement of many veteran teachers. Programs originated by Principal Walker and staff remained in place with new programs and procedures gradually implemented. I became aware of the need for major renovation in the main/oldest building and after a prolonged attempt to convince the school district invited the Pontiac Press in to view the problems. A lengthy news article and photos brought solution to the problems.    A new roof, new flooring to 7 classrooms, office and teacher lounge, new tile and paint was completed over Christmas break. Major changes occurred as a result of court ordered integration of schools to reflect Pontiac’s racial makeup. Whitfield was paired with Franklin Elementary and changed from a K-6 “Neighborhood School” to a K-4-5-6 configuration. Franklin changed to a K-1-2-3 format and students in both schools exchanged students for a three-year period. A second change involved the transfer of teaching staff from both Whitfield and Franklin to accommodate the change in grade configuration. A third change was the consolidation of Whitfield/Irving principalships. I now served as principal for two schools for a two-year period. The school district created a “Head Teacher” position in each school to assist with administration/problems. Mr. Donald MacQuarrie and Mr. John Colbert served in that role. In my thirteen years at Whitfield the students, staff and parents provided me with an excellent work relationship and from those groups came many life long friendships. I left Whitfield for Clarkston Schools for an Assistant Superintendents position, a larger salary, and the opportunity to work where our children attended school. William E. Neff  

Sylvan Lake Inn

Object ID: 2013-001-030

Date: 1893

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In 1893 Merrill B. Mills, Mansfield Shelly, George Barbour, and J. Blair Simpson decided to establish a resort at Sylvan Lake. Merrill B. Mills built a summer hotel on a hilly point separating the two parts of the lake. He did his best to encourage land sales by offering a free weekend at his hotel for those who brought a lot in the subdivision. There was a golf course, a riding stable, furnished with saddle horses, a bathing beach, a bowling alley and even a billiard parlor. The center of the resort, a hotel, was erected on the present site of the Community Center for $25,000. The grounds were lighted by electricity in connection with the interurban railway. In Addition to the hotel, owners planned a community containing 1300 building lots, six public parks, a school house, a depot and church sites. In 1903 the Sylvan Lake Inn burned down. For many years, the family of Merrill Mills gave the Detroit Free Press a restricted deed to the property formerly occupied by Mills’ summer hotel. Around 1906, Mills donated this property to The Detroit Free Press for use as the Fresh Air Camp.

Detroit Free Press Fresh Air Camp

Object ID: 2013-001-029

Date: 1920

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The Detroit Free Press Fresh Air Camp operated during the 1920’s to 1950’s. The Merrill Mills family gave the Free Press a restricted deed to the property formerly occupied by Mills’ summer Sylvan Lake Inn. The newspaper developed the property as a summer campground for underprivileged children brought out from the city for two weeks of recreation. The project was supported in part by city schoolchildren who sent in nickels to build the camp. Camp activities included baseball games on the front lawn, swimming, boating, and singing. At flag ceremonies each morning and evening the camp children recited the Pledge of Allegiance. During the weeknights the children would take turns entertaining the villagers with songs and skits. Mr. Howard Wideman stated in 1993 that city officials purchased the Detroit Free Press Fresh Air Camp for $1, with the agreement to operate it for three years as a summer camp for underprivileged children at Mr. Wideman’s urging. Detroit Free Press deeded the Fresh Air Camp property to Sylvan Lake in 1962.

Tower Beach

Object ID: 2013-001-028

Date: 1918

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Sylvan Lake, Oakland Co., Mich. August 18, 1918 When the Detroit and United Railway plotted its course through the Sylvan Lake area on its route between Pontiac and Detroit, local residents became more interested in the development of recreation. An amusement park called Tower Beach and a picnic spot called Happy Home in Voorheis Grove were developed. It became the “in” thing to pack up the whole family, a large picnic basket, mount the trolley car and spend the entire day fishing, swimming, bathing and enjoying their picnic lunch. The big day was climaxed by the trolley car ride back home. Oakland County Book of History, The Sesqui-Centennial Publication 1820 – 1970; Arthur A. Hagman, Editor October 7, 1931 Tower Beach Bridge Resolved by Trustee Cox, supported by Trustee Mitchell: that the Clerk be authorized to correspond with the proper authorities of the Michigan Eastern Railways in regard to getting information relative to securing the Tower Beach Bridge for the Village. Yeas: Sener, Cox, Mitchell, Woodbridge Resolution adopted. The late Daisy Worley remembered that the late Roy Durfee owned concessions at Tower

Oakland County Boat Club

Object ID: 2013-001-027

Date: 1912

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The Oakland County Boat Club The Oakland County Boat Club was started by seventeen men in 1912. They held monthly meetings at their homes until 1916 when the present clubhouse was built. Community meetings for the Sylvan Lake City Council and the Garden Club were frequently held at the Boat Club. The club was built on pilings and had boat wells under the structure. In the 1930’s the clubhouse was moved back seventy feet to the present location. Power boats dominated the club until World War II when sailboats took over with the fuel restrictions. Every Sunday morning in the summer, a canon would fire signaling a sailing race. The boat club had 19 members in the armed services at this time. After the war the club returned to their annual power boat regatta and had one or two per year up to the present time. They also sponsor the annual fireworks display along with the city. Founders of the Oakland County Boat Club Mary TePoorten Sax The original building was used as a social center. There was a piano, played by Frank Phillips, and a singer, Dr. Bernard TePoorten. Dr. TePoorten loved to dance and sang very well. Bernard and Frank became friends as they offered to the group the primary source of music. Men and women came here every Saturday night. Coffee and doughnuts were served while the couples square danced, waltzed and fox trotted, and did the two step. Upstairs were poker tables. When these tables were not in use, they held people’s coats. The small babies were placed on these coats. At midnight, everyone went home. Along with Dr. TePoorten and Frank Phillips, there developed a core group: The Owens brothers, Bill Knudsen, Elmer Fezzey, Charles Schlack, Mr. Farlow, Don MacDonald and his brother. The Owens brothers had boats. Form this group emerged the Oakland County Boat Club. Prior to the action of the above listed men, this was primarily a dwelling which they used for social gatherings. They have been known for years as the founders of the Oakland County Boat Club. Phillips and TePoorten were not hired performers but were a part of the social group who loved to sing and play the piano. The Beginning of the O. C. B. C. Listening to a couple of old-timers reminiscing the early days of Sylvan Lake, when the residences were few, located in the area now known as Pioneer Highlands James K Boulevard, also a few cottages near the present Boat Club site. The old D. U. R. Railroad would clatter in from Detroit and Pontiac down Garland Avenue’s north end to Sylvan Aqua and Tower Beach where the Bath House, Band Stand and Dance Hall were located. From a group of local commuting boat enthusiasts the Club was founded and the Club-house was built. There were 13 motor boats on the lake which called for an annual race regatta. Over the years of diligent efforts of a dedicated membership, thru fellowship and sportsmanship, the Club has enjoyed success n social benevolence. From the July 31, 1960 44th Annual Regatta Program.

Albert Kahn Helps Countryside Improvement Association

Object ID: 2013-001-026

Date: 1920

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The Countryside Improvement Association, as reported in the Summer newsletter (Greater West Bloomfield Historical Society), is celebrating 75 years of philanthropic activity in West Bloomfield. One of their 1920 projects, as reported by Gail Smith, occurred when…” it was brought to our notice that the (Detroit) Free Press Fresh Air Camp very much needed a suitable place for the children to eat. The first reaction to this was an appropriation of one hundred dollars, but just prior to paying this amount, our president made a personal visit to the damp and realized that wind and rain and clouds of flies just isn’t an added comfort when one is eating, and resolved that if the organization was assuming this responsibility, it must be done worthily. So we rallied to the challenge and began planning ways and means of raising the money. Dancing parties at the club, card parties everywhere, bake sales, etc. This went on until we had a sufficient sum to make a start toward an attractive, screened, and convenient mess hall, the plans having been donated by Albert Kahn. Mrs. Kahn was a member of the association. On July 10, 1920, we dedicated the building and named it Humphrey Hall, (now Sylvan Lake Community Center) after Miss Humphrey, who had given much of her time and thought to the carrying on of the work begun by Mr. Arthur Mosely at an earlier date.” And coincidently, the Kahn’s daughter, Rosalie Butzel, has just donated to the society, Albert’s street and name sign for his famed “Summer Cottage”. (1917-1968, located on the north side of Walnut Lake) along with a 3 story hand-carved bird house constructed by Mr. Hamlin, a conductor on the Farmington-Orchard Lake Interurban line, caretaker of the Campbell complex on Apple Island (1902-1905), and father of Winford Hamlin, Albert Kahn’s caretaker for forty years, who is himself quite a crafty woodworker. It was Winford, you may recall, 93 years young, that gave us a working model of the water-barrel cart and Apple Island ferry at the last annual meeting of the Society.

Whitfield Cornerstone laid newspaper article

Object ID: 2013-001-025

Date: 1929

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Notice to taxable inhabitant December 1, 1851 Sir you are herby notified that the school inspectors of the townships of Waterford, West Bloomfield, Bloomfield and Pontiac have formed a fractional school district in said townships, numbered and bounded as follows: Numbered “Six”, Bounded as follows, containing the following described lands, “to wit,” The whole of section 31 of Pontiac. The whole of section 6. Ah1/4, and W ½, of LW1/6, of section 5, of the town of Bloomfield. The whole section one, and the E ½ of 4E 1/6, of section 2. Of West Bloomfield and the LE1/6 of section 36 of Waterford. The first meeting of said district will be held at the house of Henry Windiate in said district on Monday the 15th day of December A. D. 1851, at 6 o’clock P.M. and you are herby instructed, in pursuance of the law relating to primary schools, to notify every qualified voter of said district, either personally or by leaving a written notice at his place of residence, of the time and place of said meeting for the election of officers and the transaction of such other business as may be necessary. Dated at Pontiac this 1st. day of December 1851. E. H. Whitney Clerk of the boards of school inspectors I do hereby certify that I notified all the qualified voters of the within named district on or before the 8th day of December 1851. Hiram H. Hunter Filed & Recorded December 18th A. D. 1851 A. G. Smith Director

Whitfield Cornerstone laid

Object ID: 2013-001-024

Date: 1929

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Notice to taxable inhabitant December 1, 1851 Sir you are herby notified that the school inspectors of the townships of Waterford, West Bloomfield, Bloomfield and Pontiac have formed a fractional school district in said townships, numbered and bounded as follows: Numbered “Six”, Bounded as follows, containing the following described lands, “to wit,” The whole of section 31 of Pontiac. The whole of section 6. Ah1/4, and W ½, of LW1/6, of section 5, of the town of Bloomfield. The whole section one, and the E ½ of 4E 1/6, of section 2. Of West Bloomfield and the LE1/6 of section 36 of Waterford. The first meeting of said district will be held at the house of Henry Windiate in said district on Monday the 15th day of December A. D. 1851, at 6 o’clock P.M. and you are herby instructed, in pursuance of the law relating to primary schools, to notify every qualified voter of said district, either personally or by leaving a written notice at his place of residence, of the time and place of said meeting for the election of officers and the transaction of such other business as may be necessary. Dated at Pontiac this 1st. day of December 1851. E. H. Whitney Clerk of the boards of school inspectors I do hereby certify that I notified all the qualified voters of the within named district on or before the 8th day of December 1851. Hiram H. Hunter Filed & Recorded December 18th A. D. 1851 A. G. Smith Director

Leona & C.W. Heitsch

Object ID: 2013-001-023

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 It is so cold this morning it reminds me of my Michigan roots, a kid on the farm. Mom would get up and the first thing I’d hear would be her shaking the grate on the furnace, which was in the basement under my bedroom, getting the ashes down to where she could remove them and then throw more coal on the faltering fire, then up to get breakfast for Dad and me (he out in the barn early, with Curly the cow and the heifer and letting the horses out to drink at the big tank in the barnyard, etc. and to fill mangers with hay and grain. all with snow surrounding, often more falling. After Dad drove me to school, mom would put on her denim jacket, made by the prisoners at Jackson Prison, go out to the apple shed, and the day would begin…she’d have left enough logs in the black range in the kitchen to go until noon. There were tall kerosene heaters which did about nothing, to put by the people who sorted the apples…Mr. Harger, who was also Pine Lake School Super, Mom and Dad. There were sometimes l7,000 bushels of apples in the apple storage, stacked way above Dad’s head and propped to keep from falling with 2×4 s  in several places.  A track ran down the middle of the storage,it stood about 2 1/2 feet above the floor, and crates were put on the track to push them out to the sorting shed, which used to be a pig pen before we got there. Mr. Harger poured bushels into the “maw” and the apples were carried on a belt with holes to capture and hold big apples and let the little ones drop into a crate by the side, the big apples went into a  polisher, rotating brushes which directed apples forward with flopping rags above to polish them, they spilled out into the sorting area, long  round wooden rods wrapped with rope to keep the apples advancing while mom picked off the bad apples to put in a crate beside her, they then spilled into three bins, sorted again by belts with holes, and Dad crated the apples in paper lined crates (we did a hundred of these each time he was to drive a load to the Union Produce Terminal in Detroit) and stacked them for loading on the the 39 Dodge for a trip to Detroit.  (These trips were early in the AM, so he could be back to Walnut Glen Fruit Farms to work up more apples).  It was cold on mother’s toes, I am sure, standing there all day, even with a kerosene heater not too far away. With temperatures that cold, apples could not be forever left in the sorting room, or on the truck, they would freeze. Yet in all those years of sorting, 1939 through years in the 50s, nothing ever froze. Mom would go in to fix lunch, Mr. Harger would come in and eat his packed lunch in the kitchen, and they’d go back, time out for Dad to come and get me from Pine Lake School.  I’d help some until time for Mr. Harger to go home and for us to do the chores in the barn, and have supper.  Sometimes it was up to me to put some more wood in the kitchen range and move the huge aluminum teakettles over from the side of the range, so they would be boiling when Mom came in.   (No piped hot water, the big kettles were our supply for dishwashing). The reason I started this was to explain my mother.  Dad and I decided, one Christmas, that she should have something warmer than the Jackson Prison denim.  We got, from an Army surplus store, a coat that would serve to keep a trooper warm no matter what.  So proud we were.  Mother opened the package at Christmas, told us that her denim coat was good enough and she wanted to take our purchase back and go to Sears in Pontiac and buy curtains for the dining room, which served as living room too, as the living room was closed off for the winter, to keep the house warmer.  She did it, and bought a curtain stretcher a thing which had small thin nails all along it, and could be set up to fit whatever size curtain you had, you could put on several curtains.  So the morning sun came up through fresh new curtains, I kind of wish I had kept a swatch of one of them, just to show the pattern mother chose. It is cold enough today in Missouri to think of this, but no Michigan like crunch of snow, just bare ground and hungry birds flocking to feeders.

Thaddeus Seeley Article

Object ID: 2013-001-022

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Thaddeus Seeley Article

The Venice of the Lakes brochure page

Object ID: 2013-001-021

Date: 1920

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Cass Lake Venice Company property sale brochure located on Cass and Sylvan Lakes map

The Venice of the Lakes brochure page

Object ID: 2013-001-020

Date: 1920

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Cass Lake Venice Company property sale brochure located on Cass and Sylvan Lakes

The Venice of the Lakes brochure page

Object ID: 2013-001-019

Date: 1920

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Cass Lake Venice Company property sale brochure located on Cass and Sylvan Lakes

The Venice of the Lakes brochure page

Object ID: 2013-001-018

Date: 1920

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Cass Lake Venice Company property sale brochure located on Cass and Sylvan Lakes

The Venice of the Lakes brochure page

Object ID: 2013-001-017

Date: 1920

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Cass Lake Venice Company property sale brochure located on Cass and Sylvan Lakes

The Venice of the Lakes brochure page

Object ID: 2013-001-016

Date: 1920

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Cass Lake Venice Company property sale brochure located on Cass and Sylvan Lakes

The Venice of the Lakes brochure page

Object ID: 2013-001-015

Date: 1920

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Cass Lake Venice Company property sale brochure located on Cass and Sylvan Lakes

The Venice of the Lakes brochure page

Object ID: 2013-001-014

Date: 1920

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Cass Lake Venice Company property sale brochure located on Cass and Sylvan Lakes

The Venice of the Lakes brochure page

Object ID: 2013-001-013

Date: 1920

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Cass Lake Venice Company property sale brochure located on Cass and Sylvan Lakes

Search for Whitfield School grads who served in World War II

Object ID: 2013-001-012

Date: 2012

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World War II veterans (from left) Marvin Hole, Jerry Stoll (not a veteran but a Whitfield School classmate), Jim Coates and Lyle Filkins during their reunion on August 20.

Search for Whitfield School grads who served in World War II

Object ID: 2013-001-011

Date: 2012

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On November 6, 1943, Glenn Husted, superintendent of Daniel Whitfield Elementary School in Sylvan Lake, wrote his first “Dear Joe Whitfield” letter to a graduate of the school serving in the U.S. armed services during World War II. He eventually corresponded with about 45 young servicemen. Recently Mr. Husted’s daughter, Mrs. Sharie Husted VanGilder, found some 70 letters to and from her father. As a girl, Mrs. VanGilder remembers going to Whitfield School on Sunday afternoons as her father wrote the letters on the school typewriter while she helped with mimeographing. Since the end of June, Mrs. VanGilder, along with GWBHS Board member Helen Jane Peters and Randy Rogers, a former Whitfield student now living in Seoul, Korea, have located 16 men or their families and returned the original letters to them. According to Mrs. Peters, “It is very heartwarming when a son or daughter says This is the only correspondence we have from my father during World War II.” For information on the search see the Facebook Daniel Whitfield Elementary School alumni page or call Mrs. Peters, 248-681-9568.

U of M Preservation Assessment Survey

Object ID: 2013-001-010

Date: 2011

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U of M Preservation Assessment Survey Thank you again, Sara Sterkenburg, Jeff Nash and Paul Wentzell, University of Michigan, School of Information, graduate students for compiling an incredibly comprehensive report for the GWBHS digitization of gwbhs records. This follow-up report to the Preservation Assessment Survey will help guide our organization both in short and long-term needs. Your recommendations are now being implemented.

Fire Department

Object ID: 2013-001-009

Date: 1952

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Walnut Lake Volunteer Fire Department letterhead. Incorporated on October 24, 1950 by Roscoe C. Banker. Absorbed by West Bloomfield Fire Dept. on March 10, 1952.

Harger Tea Set image

Object ID: 2013-001-008

Date: 2011

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Harger Tea Set image. Set owned by Marjorie Newell

Green School Memory Tablecloth

Object ID: 2013-001-007

Date: 2011

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Green School Memory Tablecloth at Annual Meeting A tablecloth that was a fundraiser for Green Elementary School in West Bloomfield some 60 years ago was displayed and described at the Annual Meeting by Board member Helen Jane Peters. According to Mrs. Peters, in the 1950s families living in the Green School area were each given a handkerchief-sized square of fabric and asked to sign their names, which were then embroidered with green embroidery floss. The squares Ð with about 316 names Ð were joined together with crochet work making a tablecloth about 54 inches by 98 inches with 66 squares. Funds for the maintenance of Green School were raised by raffling off the tablecloth. Mrs. Jean B. Clark, who won the raffle, donated the tablecloth to the GWBHS on March 24, 1995.

Helen Jane Peters

Object ID: 2013-001-006

Date: 2011

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Board member Helen Jane Peters received the society’s highest honor, the GWBHS Distinguished Service Award, “in appreciation for many years of collecting, preserving and sharing the history of Sylvan Lake.” Mrs. Peters is the City of Sylvan Lake historian as well as GWBHS historian and membership chair.

Westacres

Object ID: 2013-001-005

Date: 2011

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Six residents of Westacres accepted the award for the subdivision founded as a low-income project for “qualified” industrial workers in the 1930s that has become a model community with a rich tradition and cohesiveness that make it “a community where it has always been a privilege to live,” as a resident wrote. Representing Westacres, recognized for 75 years of service to the West Bloomfield community, were, left to right, Meghan Galbraith-Crowe, Theresa Alflen-Michand, Bob Alflen, Doug Bond, Joanne Jensen and Kyle Staulter.

Countryside Improvement Association

Object ID: 2013-001-004

Date: 2011

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Countryside Improvement Association, represented by former presidents Margaret Johnson and Mary Lee Gwizdala, was cited for 100 years of notable service beginning in l911. The first project of improving the unpaved roads around Pine and Orchard Lakes has been followed by a wide variety of projects positively impacting life in the area.Buzz Brown with Margaret Johnson, left, and Mary Lee Gwizdala of the Countryside Improvement Association, honored for 100 years of notable service.

Fr. Timothy Whalen

Object ID: 2013-001-003

Date: 2011

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Fr. Timothy Whalen, former Chancellor of Orchard Lake Schools, was honored for overseeing the creation of a master plan for the historic campus, on the site of the former Michigan Military Academy, and for renovation of historic archives and other collections on campus. GWBHS President Buzz Brown, left, with Fr. Timothy Whalen, former Chancellor of Orchard Lake Schools.

Green Family Clock

Object ID: 2013-001-002

Date: 2011

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Donald and Ivy Green with the Green School clock they donated to the historical society. The couple represented the Hartwell Green family who were honored with an Outstanding Community Service award.

Green Family Clock

Object ID: 2013-001-001

Date: 2011

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Donald and Ivy Green with the Green School clock they donated to the historical society. The couple represented the Hartwell Green family who were honored with an Outstanding Community Service award.

Campbell Linn Coin

Object ID: 2012-011-030

Date: 1862

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Civil War Token

Campbell Linn Coin

Object ID: 2012-011-029

Date: 1862

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Civil War Token

Columbarium

Object ID: 2012-011-028

Date: 2006

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Columbarium – located at the top of the driveway near the upper parking lot, built by the association in 2006.

Beckley-Amaya, Myles

Object ID: 2012-011-027

Date: 2008

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Beckley-Amaya, Myles. Life size bronze statue captures the spirit of this little boy’s life which came to a tragic end from a horseback riding accident while on vacation in 2008. Actual size and life like, note the curly hair of this child born to a Jamaican mother and Swedish father. The “thumbs up” on his hands is the personal signature of this lively little boy. Section F-45

Carl Cuban’s headstone

Object ID: 2012-011-026

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Nearby, see engineer Carl Cuban’s headstone, cast in the shape of a book.

Van Arnem plot

Object ID: 2012-011-025

Date: 2001

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Van Arnem plot. Note this family’s tall obelisk memorial marker in Section H-O. Daughter Heidi Van Arnem died in 2001 at age 35. She was a quadriplegic since age 16 from a gunshot wound which severed her spinal column. She was the founder andCEO of iCan, an online community that “provides information and services to 54 million people living with disabilities in the US.” She also served as commissioner for disability concerns for the state of Michigan.

Kyle family plot – Father David

Object ID: 2012-011-024

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Kyle family plot – Father David was the founder of the cemetery’s Association. Section C.

Stickley marker

Object ID: 2012-011-023

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Stickley marker at OC 79-1. Note the names of his three wives, all sharing the same headstone. Section OC-79-1. There are 11 Stickley plots in the cemetery.

Armenian – Bardizbanain family (Vanta and Paul)

Object ID: 2012-011-022

Date: 1915

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Armenian – Bardizbanain family (Vanta and Paul) also paid tribute to the many “perished in the 1915 Armenian Genocide” on the headstone. Note the stylized Armenian cross, seen in several headstones in the cemetery. Section OS

Whitmer Family – (Claude)

Object ID: 2012-011-021

Date: 1941

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Whitmer Family – (Claude) This prominent family donated the large American-made Herschede chiming hall clock to the township, now in the GWBH museum. Claude started the first WB zoning board in 1941. Section E-30.

John F. Greer

Object ID: 2012-011-020

Date: 1897

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John F. Greer – Died 1897. Significance of tree trunk design with large anchor at the base of this tall cast cement headstone is unknown, although anchor is a symbol of faith at cemeteries. Family had prominent role in WB politics and development. There are 20 family plots in Section OC.

Potters Field

Object ID: 2012-011-019

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Potters Field – Old North section – originally established by the township for burial of indigents. No visible headstones of markers are seen.

Richard McManus

Object ID: 2012-011-018

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Richard McManus headstone just west of strong plot in Section E. was designed by Cranbrook artist Marshall Fredericks. The unique headstone cannot be missed and was most likely chosen by engineer McManus before his death.

William Washburn

Object ID: 2012-011-017

Date: 1838

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William’s daughter, Lodema, married William Washburn in 1819. Had three children, Albert, Mary J., and Mary. Mary J. Washburn died at age 3 years, 11 months on Jan. 3, 1838. Her headstone was erroneously read as 1801 until someone confirmed that it was in 1838.

Durkee / Washburn – William Durkee

Object ID: 2012-011-016

Date: 1842

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Durkee / Washburn – William Durkee (d. 1842) came from Vermont and settled 160 acres at Pine Lake in 1829 on which the first house in the township was built. He had five children: William, Lodema, Eratus, Jedediah, and Lucretia. Jedediah was known as “The Wolfman” because he tracked and killed so many wolves in West Bloomfield. In his journals, he writes that “The family of Esquire Ellenwood lost by fire his house and all its contents and I took him and his family of twelve persons into my house, making twenty four inmates. They lived with us about two months until they would build.” Eban Ellenwood was the first burial on Jedediah’s land parcel in 1831, which later became the Pine Lake Cemetery. Jedediah died in 1883. Section OC-105 Wife Phelby is nearby.

Norm Cash

Object ID: 2012-011-015

Date: 1968

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Norm Cash – first base player for the Detroit Tigers and member of the championship team of ’68. Headstone was recently moved over about 5 inches. Section F-02-3

Nick Pietrosante

Object ID: 2012-011-014

Date: 1959

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Nick Pietrosante – All pro fullback in the NFL, playing for Detroit Lions and Cleveland Indians before his death due to cancer at age 50. He was a fullback at University of Notre Dame and talented all around athlete. He was drafted by the Lions in 1959 NS HWLS RHW ll-time rusing record for Detroit. Section B-36.

Major General Frederick Smith Strong, Jr.

Object ID: 2012-011-013

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Headstone remembering Major General Frederick Smith Strong, Jr. is located next to his wife’s grave Marjorie Ward Strong in section F. He was a strong supporter of keeping this area in as natural state as possible and donated Apple Island to the community, along with a large parcel of land on the bank of Orchard Lake, now known as The Marjorie Ward Strong Nature Center. His actual grave is at West Point. Section E – 45

Commemorative plaque

Object ID: 2012-011-012

Date: 1976

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Commemorative plaque dedicated in 1976 by WB Bicentennial commission. Visit the flagpole area to see the plaque placed by the committsion and a commemorative stone fro the service of the Haskins family at the cemetery.

Evangeline Lindbergh

Object ID: 2012-011-011

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Evangeline Lindbergh, mother of aviator, Colonel Charles Lindbergh. She was a local schoolteacher and is buried in section E. Next to her is her brother, Charles Henry Land, uncle of Charles. He was originally interred in Lucerne, Switzerland. Sen. Harvey Lodge was buried there in May, 1975 and is thought to be the largest funeral remembered by caretaker, Harold Haskins. Section E-55.

John Ellenwood

Object ID: 2012-011-010

Date: 1848

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John Ellenwood – Surveyor and first postmaster who is said to have mapped out first roads and acted as school commissioner and WB township supervisor was buried in 1848. OC – 114

Ellenwood

Object ID: 2012-011-009

Date: 1931

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Ellenwood, The first burial at Pine Lake was Eban Ellenwood in Feb. 7, 1831. He is thought to be a relative of John Ellenwood, who had a large family and many visitors over the years at their home. OS